CAA protests: Lawyers shout ‘shame, shame’ as Delhi HC rejects students’ plea for relief from arrest

The plea sought direction to set up a court-monitored committee headed by a retired High Court or Supreme Court judge for the conduct of a judicial inquiry into the violence at Jamia University in a time-bound man.

High drama was witnessed in the Delhi High court on Thursday as lawyers chanted “shame shame” after the court refused to grant interim protection from arrest to students protesting against the Citizenship Amendment Act. The court was hearing a plea seeking interim protection from coercive action against students, besides setting up a court-monitored committee to probe the violence at Jamia Millia Islamia.

Rejecting the demand for interim protection from arrest to students and setting up of the judicial commission, the bench of Chief Justice DN Patel issued a notice to the Centre, the Delhi government and the police on pleas filed by Jamia students — Ladida Farzana and Ayesha Renna, along with advocate Nabila Hasan. The plea also sought protection from arrests made in connection with the December 15 protests at Jamia Milia Islamia University.

After the high court declined to grant interim protection to the students, lawyers began to chant “shame, shame, shame on the judiciary, shame on the chief justice”.

One advocate, R P Luthra, opposed the sloganeering and said, “This is a court of law and there has to be judicial discipline”. However, other advocates, including many senior counsels, countered Luthra as to why he was supporting the Delhi HC Chief Justice even when there has been “miscarriage of justice” in the court as the “matter concerns life and liberty of students and saving of the constitution of India.”

They told advocate Luthra that all were officers of the court and it was everyone’s duty to uphold the law and the constitution.

On Wednesday, the high court refused to grant interim protection from coercive action to two women students of Jamia Millia Islamia as they were not specific to the facts of their plea and the nature of the relief they were seeking.

As per the Supreme Court order passed on Wednesday, petitioners are directed to approach high courts in their respective states where incidents of violence took place.

Source: The Indian Express

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